Melinda Tankard Reist – Rejecting Sexploitation

Melinda Tankard Reist founded Collective Shout ten years ago, a grassroots campaigns movement for a world free of sexploitation in all its forms. She’s an author, speaker, media commentator, blogger and advocate for women and girls.

Melinda is best known for her work addressing sexualization, objectification, harms of pornography, sexual exploitation, trafficking, and violence against women.

Constant abuse and sometimes even death threats have become common occurrences for Melinda Tankard Reist. Those reactions only serve to highlight the seriousness of the topics that she raises in our society.

I was honoured to have her join me on my podcast, Bleeding Daylight. You can hear our discussion by looking for Bleeding Daylight wherever you find podcasts, or listen using the media player below.

The issues raised are very important and so I urge you to share this episode with others.



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Meg Glesener – Finding Home

Meg Glesener is a remarkable woman who has turned a traumatic upbringing into a life that brings love and hope to so many.

Meg’s home is one marked by openness, safety, and love but her experience of a family home growing up was starkly different.

These days, she hosts and produces the podcast Letters from Home. I’m honored to have her join me as a guest on the latest episode of Bleeding Daylight.

You can hear her story on Bleeding Daylight wherever you find podcasts or click play on the audio player below.



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Father’s Day 2020

Dad was a FIFO worker before there was such a thing. These days FIFO stands for ‘Fly In Fly Out’ but back then dad would ‘Float In Float Out’. He worked as a cook on ships, mostly heading up and down the Western Australian coast. That meant that dad would be absent from our home for weeks at a time.

When he was home I don’t know that he really knew how to interact with his children and I’m not sure that I knew how to interact with him.

Even though there was often both a physical and emotional distance between us, my dad was a good dad who did the best job of fathering he could.

I’m now coming to realise that there are many things that I see in my self today that can be traced directly back to my father and the influence he still has on me.

Maybe I could point to things I wish were different when I was young but really, I didn’t miss out on much. Life was pretty good and a lot of that was down to the love of an imperfect father. These days I’m an imperfect father, so the last thing I want to do is blame dad for the things I may have missed out on while growing up. Instead, I blame my dad for a range of other things.

I blame my father for the fact that time and time again I suddenly find myself awake in the middle of the night. I wake up and sense someone is in the room. Someone small and furry … with whiskers. It’s one, or often both of our cats wanting to get in under the covers. I love cats. I love them because my dad loved cats. He loved most animals but especially cats.

I blame my father for some of the music that is still stuck in my head. Dad was almost 44 years older than me and so his musical tastes weren’t exactly ‘current’. Which explains why to this day, among a very wide range of music in my collection, covering many different styles, I still listen to Bing Crosby, dad’s favourite singer. (Just don’t mention that I also listen to Sinatra. Dad was certainly not a fan.)

I blame my father for the fact that I’m a qualified chef. Dad was a chef and I followed that career for a number of years. I completed my four year apprenticeship then decided it really wasn’t for me, but it has given me skills I’ve been able to use ever since. It also meant that some years later I was able to work alongside dad for a week when he was cooking at a camp on Rottnest. It was a memorable week.

There are many more things I can see in me that come from my dad. Some good, some not so good. I also know there would be many other parts of who I am that I don’t even recognise as coming from dad but are still part of his influence.

My dad was a good dad who provided for his family well and did the best he could.

It’s Father’s Day in Australia.

This is my nineteenth Father’s Day without my dad. George Thomas Olsen passed away in August 2002, just a few days before his 83rd birthday and around a month before Father’s Day of that year.

I really do miss dad but it’s not with an overwhelming sadness because I know he’s in a better place and I know I’ll see him again one day.

I still wish he was able to see Emily and James grow up into the wonderful young people that they’ve become and to get to know Pauline even better. I reckon he would have really enjoyed getting to know Emily’s husband, Josh. I wish Emily and James had more time to get to know their grandad.

I look forward to a new day when we’ll catch up on everything we’ve missed over the years.

“He will wipe away every tear from their eyes, and death shall be no more, neither shall there be mourning, nor crying, nor pain anymore, for the former things have passed away.” – Revelation 21:4

Today won’t be a sad day because I’ll be spending the day being a dad to my own children and working hard to ensure that there are many ‘good’ things that they’ll be able to blame me for in the years to come.

(Yes, that’s me with my dad and mum in the picture above. You can click on it for a closer look.)



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Shea Watson – Tragedy into Testimony

Many of us face difficulties, but how do you hold out hope when life continues to push you back down, leaving you broken?

Shea Watson has seen some of the worst that life can bring. From times of brokenness and not being able to see any hope at all, he’s now able to offer lasting hope to others, a hope that transcends it all.

“This is a message that heals people, and that healing … I can’t even describe the healing but I know that it’s there and I know that it’s real and it hasn’t gone away.” – Shea Watson

He co-hosts The Pantry Podcast with his wife, Michelle.

Shea shared his inspiring story with me on my podcast, Bleeding Daylight. You can listen wherever you find podcasts, or click play on the audio player below.



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Jean Bailey Robor – Overcoming Excuses

Jean Bailey Robor is an international writer, speaker, comic, professional communicator, and so much more.

Her book, ‘She Has a Big But: Get Past Your Excuses and Realize Your Dreams’ tells the stories of women who’ve overcome obstacles and excuses on their way to success. She is also a successful fitness coach for over 50s.

Jean is my guest on my podcast, Bleeding Daylight, this week.

You can listen wherever you find podcasts or use the audio player below.



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