The Escape: Ten Years Later

This time a decade ago I was unsure if I would see Australia or those I love the most ever again.

It was April 2008. I was meant to be in Port-au-Prince, the capital of Haiti, for just over a week. Around 48 hours after arriving, I was back at the airport praying for the arrival of a plane to get us out of a city in chaos. Violent rioting and looting had taken over the streets.

The Global Financial Crisis of the time had created a Global Food Crisis. People in some of the world’s poorest countries could no longer afford even the most basic of foods.

I was in Haiti as part of my work for 98five Sonshine FM. I was one of four radio announcers invited by Compassion Australia to see their work first-hand. What we saw was the kind of desperation that grips people when they can’t put food on the family table.

A news report at the time described the scenes in Port-au-Prince.

The Haitian capital was paralysed by food riots yesterday as the United Nations gave warning that soaring food prices were spurring unrest around the world.

Rioters returned to the streets in Port-au-Prince a day after UN peacekeepers had to fire rubber bullets to prevent hungry Haitians from storming the presidential palace. Columns of smoke rose over the city as demonstrators, demanding that the Government take action over the rising price of foodstuffs such as rice, beans and oil, set fire to barricades made from tyres.

At least five people have been killed and more than 20 injured. Protesters compared the burning hunger in their stomachs to bleach or battery acid.The Times Online

The BBC reported the riots in a story titled, ‘Hungry mob attacks Haiti palace’.

Crowds of demonstrators in Haiti have tried to storm the presidential palace in the capital Port-au-Prince as protests continue over food prices.

Witnesses say the protesters used metal bins to try to smash down the palace gates before UN troops fired rubber bullets and tear gas to disperse them.

Several people are reported to have been injured in the clashes.

At least five people have been killed in Haiti since the unrest began last week in the southern city of Les Cayes.

The demonstrators outside the presidential palace said the rising cost of living in Haiti meant they were struggling to feed themselves.

“We are hungry,” they shouted before attempting to smash open the palace gates.

In recent months, it has become common among Haiti’s poor to use the expression “grangou klowox” or “eating bleach”, to describe the daily hunger pains people face, because of the burning feeling in their stomachs.BBC

After seeing just one Compassion project in action our team had to retreat to the relative safety of the local Compassion office. While watching panicked crowds running down the main road outside the office, the room we were in was showered with glass. A rock thrown from the streets below had smashed through the second story window where we had stood just moments before.

When the situation eventually reached a temporary calm we climbed into a couple of four-wheel drives and retreated to our hotel. The bustling streets we had travelled that morning now looked like a war zone. Businesses up and down the road had been attacked and looted. I remember noticing a service station that morning which was operating normally. Cars were filling up with petrol, people were going in and out of the attached shop. On the way back to the hotel that evening the same service station looked derelict. Not one piece of glass remained in place and every shelf in the shop had been completely stripped.

We were glad and relieved when we drove through the gates of the hotel. From there plans were made to fly us out the next day.

The Airport Journey

When the morning arrived we packed our luggage into the four-wheel drives to head towards the airport. We had no idea of the dramatic journey ahead.

As we began the drive we found that more and more roads had been barricaded and blocked. We had to take smaller and smaller side roads. Most seemed to be rocky, narrow, dirt tracks.

The further we went the more people seemed to be surrounding us. It was hard to tell if the crowds were just people wanting to go about their day to day business or if they were likely to attack our vehicles seeking food or money to purchase food. To make sense of what was happening we could only rely on those in our vehicles who spoke Haitian Creole and even then we only got some of the story. They were more than a little occupied with trying to navigate our way out and in keeping us all safe.

At one point an angry man with a steel bar seemed to be trying to incite the crowds against us. Just as the mood was heating up someone in the crowd pointed to the Compassion logo on the side of our vehicle and said something along the lines of, “They’re from Compassion. They help our children. Let them go.”

There was another incident when a man with a machete jumped onto the back of our vehicle. Thankfully, he jumped off almost as quickly.

We eventually passed that area but the ever-growing crowds made the trip very slow and we had to stop many times as people swarmed in front of our vehicles.

At one stage we came to a complete standstill. Edouard Lassegue, Compassion’s Vice President of the Latin America and Caribbean Regions was travelling with us. Originally from Haiti, Edouard got out of our vehicle to speak to people around about us to see if there was a way forward. He stayed in contact with the local Compassion staff in our vehicle via mobile phone as he wandered through the crowd. At one stage one of the men with us who had been speaking with Edouard just shook his head and said, “There’s no way out. There’s no way out.”

Thankfully Edouard did find someone willing to show us a way through. At that point, we didn’t know if the young man who had offered help could truly get us out or whether he had friends waiting for us and we were being led into a trap, but we couldn’t stay where we were.

Weapons of Mass Distraction

We moved very slowly down the narrow laneways. It seemed that if we’d opened the windows of our vehicles we could have reached out and touched the buildings on either side.

Eventually, we turned a corner to see a crew-cab ute or ‘pickup’ parked in the middle of the street ahead of us. There were several people standing on the rear tray of the vehicle, all heavily armed with automatic weapons. Thankfully, they were also wearing police vests.

Edouard once again stepped out of our vehicle and moved slowly toward the police with his arms high in the air to show he wasn’t armed. After hearing about our situation, the police gave us an armed escort the rest of the way to the airport.

Our troubles weren’t over at that point but we were safe. We then had to wait many hours for a flight out of Haiti.

Mixed Emotions

Finally, we boarded the plane which would take us back to Miami before a flight the next day to visit Compassion’s work in the Dominican Republic.

As we gathered speed along the runway I remember seeing smoke rising across Port-au-Prince.

I felt relieved that we were leaving, that we were safe, but at the same time, I knew that for millions of Haitians, there was no option to leave. They were still in the streets facing the reality of the daily battle to find food. They didn’t know when they might next be able to feed their families. Life in one of the world’s poorest nations was just getting tougher.

I knew at that point that I needed to tell and retell their story. We had been in danger for a short time. The people we had just left behind were still in danger without any way of escaping.

The children that were sponsored through Compassion would continue to receive care, and I was so thankful for that, but so many more needed help. I knew that I needed to tell more people about the opportunity to make a difference for those children and their families.

Those events of a decade ago convinced me that I would do whatever I could to partner with Compassion to see more children released from poverty in Jesus’ name. For a few years after that incident, I used my position working in radio to speak of Compassion’s work. Then late in 2013, I had the opportunity to work for Compassion, which is where I’ve now been for over four years.

There’s much more to be done in places like Haiti and the other countries where Compassion works.

Later this year I’ll be cycling 4,300 kilometres from one side of Australia to the other to raise money for Compassion’s Highly Vulnerable Children’s Fund. If you’d like to donate towards that fund just follow this link. Maybe you’d like to make an ongoing contribution by sponsoring a child. You can do that right now by following this link.

Ten years ago I escaped a dangerous situation but for millions of children around the world, the danger goes on. Please consider what you might do to change their world.

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All I want for Christmas

GiftCatalogue.jpgI’m torn.

Most of us love receiving gifts and now that we’re into the Christmas season our thoughts go to giving and receiving. I’ve got to be honest and say that I’d love to get lots of exciting gifts this Christmas but while I’m being honest I also have to admit that there’s not really much that I need.

On the other hand there are millions of people around the world who, through no fault of their own, don’t even have enough to feed themselves or their families.

The Global Food Crisis continues to claim lives and the crisis is only deepening.

Compassion Australia has now released their Global Food Crisis Appeal Gift Catalogue. It’s full of a gift ideas that will save lives. Did you realise that just $14 can help feed a child for a month? How can we indulge ourselves with stuff we don’t need when such a small gift can give life? How thankful would we be if it was our child being saved with that gift?

Compassion Australia’s CEO, Paul O’Rourke explains the need for the catalogue.

Every night over 300 million children go to bed hungry. An emerging global food crisis threatens to widen this tragedy by forcing an additional 100 million people into extreme poverty.

Knowing that children are going without food for one day is bad enough, but knowing that, because of the global food crisis, children are going without food for days on end is simply too hard to stomach.

Here in Australia we may be feeling the pinch of having to pay a few cents more for petrol and food, but it is those who already struggle to live on less than a dollar a day that are paying the worst price of all – the inability to feed their children.

Here at Compassion we have committed to raise $2 million dollars by 30 June 2009. We are constantly asked if we have a gift catalogue, so we have combined the need to raise money for this urgent cause with people’s desire to buy gifts for friends, colleagues and family. We hope that as you eat dinner each evening you will pray for those who don’t have what you have, and when you need to buy a gift, as we all do, consider buying a gift that has more meaning than most.

Thank you for your support.

Blessings

Paul O’Rourke
Chief Executive Officer

I hope you’ll have a wonderful Christmas and that you enjoy the giving and receiving of gifts, but I also hope that you’ll carefully consider helping those in desperate need by choosing something from the Compassion catalogue.

I don’t want my selfishness to contribute to the problem so I’m hoping that when people consider what gifts to give me this year they’ll choose them from a catalogue like this one.

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FAST for FOOD – Day Thirty

Fast_for_Food.jpg

Today is the final day of FAST for FOOD which has run throughout November and is a response to the Global Food Crisis that is threatening millions of lives.

If this is the first you’ve heard of this initiative of Compassion you can read my earlier posts. Every 7 Seconds … and FAST for FOOD Explained.

Each day throughout November I’ve posted a short Bible passage from the FAST for FOOD Calendar.

There is a theme for each week of the month and a passage to read as a focus of prayer.

The theme of week four is – DECLARE

Let’s use our God-given authority to speak into situations by boldly declaring His word.

DAY 30 – Ephesians 3:20–21

Now to him who is able to do immeasurably more than all we ask or imagine, according to his power that is at work within us, to him be glory in the church and in Christ Jesus throughout all generations, for ever and ever! Amen.

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Fast for FOOD – Day Twenty Nine

Fast_for_Food.jpg

We’re now into the fourth and final week of FAST for FOOD which runs throughout November and is a response to the Global Food Crisis that is threatening millions of lives.

If this is the first you’ve heard of this initiative of Compassion you can read my earlier posts. Every 7 Seconds … and FAST for FOOD Explained.

Each day throughout November I’m posting a short Bible passage from the FAST for FOOD Calendar.

There is a theme for each week of the month and a passage to read as a focus of prayer.

The theme of week four is – DECLARE

Let’s use our God-given authority to speak into situations by boldly declaring His word.

DAY 29 – Psalm 150 – Praise God

Praise the Lord. Praise God in his sanctuary; praise him in his mighty heavens. Praise him for his acts of power; praise him for his surpassing greatness. Praise him with the sounding of the trumpet, praise him with the harp and lyre, praise him with tambourine and dancing, praise him with the strings and flute, praise him with the clash of cymbals, praise him with resounding cymbals. Let everything that has breath praise the Lord. Praise the Lord.

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FAST for FOOD – Day Twenty Eight

Fast_for_Food.jpg

We’re now into the fourth and final week of FAST for FOOD which runs throughout November and is a response to the Global Food Crisis that is threatening millions of lives.

If this is the first you’ve heard of this initiative of Compassion you can read my earlier posts. Every 7 Seconds … and FAST for FOOD Explained.

Each day throughout November I’m posting a short Bible passage from the FAST for FOOD Calendar.

There is a theme for each week of the month and a passage to read as a focus of prayer.

The theme of week four is – DECLARE

Let’s use our God-given authority to speak into situations by boldly declaring His word.

DAY 28 – Psalm 45:13–21 – Faithfulness

Your kingdom is an everlasting kingdom, and your dominion endures through all generations. The Lord is faithful to all his promises and loving toward all he has made. The Lord upholds all those who fall and lifts up all who are bowed down. The eyes of all look to you, and you give them their food at the proper time. You open your hand and satisfy the desires of every living thing.

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