Rusty

Just before COVID-19 shut down the world, I was in the Philippines with Compassion Australia.

Simply by the fact that I was born in Australia, I have had more opportunities than I deserve and I live a very ‘comfortable’ life. The same can’t be said for Rusty, a young boy who lives with his parents in a shanty owned by his grandmother.

When we met the family, Rusty’s dad Ricky was working as a farmer and earning around 300 pesos per week. That’s just 20 Australian dollars for an entire week’s work.

Rusty’s mum, Thelma, cares for her five children in their small makeshift home. The family often struggle to meet their basic needs and they often go into the forest to gather edible plants to eat.

The children lug heavy buckets of water to their shanty from a nearby creek. They don’t have the luxury of just turning on a tap. While many of us have more than one toilet in our homes, Rusty’s family shares a toilet with another family.

One day, a heavy storm was battering the roof and the walls of their home. Rusty’s family decided to move to his uncle’s house where they thought they’d be safe. But on the way, Rusty slipped and fell, hitting his head on a rock. To stop the bleeding, Thelma rushed him to the hospital where he had to have stitches.

When Rusty and his family were evacuating their home for the relative safety of his uncles’ house during a storm, Rusty fell and gashed his head on a rock. His parents borrowed the money to pay for his medical needs. They’re still paying back the debt.

Things will get better because Rusty has been registered with Compassion and is waiting for a sponsor.

Please take a couple of minutes to watch this video of the day I visited Rusty’s home.

I know that life would have become even harder for this family since the pandemic. Can I ask you to consider sponsoring a child like Rusty and bring hope into their life? Please sponsor a child today.



Do you think some of your friends would enjoy reading Rusty? Please use the buttons below to share the post. Thanks.

Faith

Just before COVID-19 shut down the world, I was in the Philippines with Compassion Australia.

One of the families that grabbed my heart was that of Ferdinand and Lorielyn.

Their daughter Faith was almost three when we visited and was registered to be sponsored through Compassion.

Ferdinand is a farm labourer when he can find work. Lorielyn is a full-time mum.

The family lives in the home you can see behind them in the photo above. It’s made of scrap galvanised iron. It’s dark and sparse inside. They don’t own the land and so the owner could ask for the land back at any time if he wants to sell the lot.

Their 18-year-old daughter, Lhean, seen next to Ferdinand, has cerebral palsy. The love, care, and gentleness that Ferdinand shows Lhean is amazing and inspiring.

Unfortunately, they don’t have the money needed for the regular medical check-ups that Lhean requires or the ongoing medication she needs to manage the condition. They simply do the best they can. They are facing a major medical issue without the means to care for their daughter.

To me, that’s unacceptable.

In a world of iPhone 12s, Airbus A380s, millionaire sports stars, and musicians, how can we not be caring for each other? How can we not be ensuring that everyone has enough?

Thankfully, Faith was recently sponsored but there are many others just like her that still need to find a sponsor.

Please take a couple of minutes to watch this video about their story.

I know that life would have become even harder for this family since the pandemic. Can I ask you to consider sponsoring a child like Faith and bring hope into their life? Please sponsor a child today.



Do you think some of your friends would enjoy reading Faith? Please use the buttons below to share the post. Thanks.

Thankful for another year

I don’t think that 2020 has been the ideal year for anyone but for me it has been another year together with Pauline, facing whatever this world has thrown at us, and that has made it another year to celebrate.

There have been ups and downs beyond our control, including terrible loss, but we’ve traveled the road, side by side. It’s been a mixture of the ‘for better or for worse’ that we agreed to all those years ago.

Twenty eight.

Twenty eight years ago on a very hot, Perth summer’s day, I put on a suit, went to church, and said goodbye to single life.

It was a very good decision and a very good day.

Best Day Ever

While it was a truly wonderful day with so many highlights, it wasn’t a perfect day. While friends and family were free to wear ‘summer appropriate’ clothing, Pauline was in a massive white dress and I was in a black suit. There was no way to escape the heat.

There were other little things that didn’t quite follow the plan for a perfect day but it was still the best day ever. It was the day that we had been waiting for. It was the day that, no matter what didn’t go to plan, we would be joined together ’til death do us part’.

Pauline and I had met in her mother’s kitchen on the 18th of January in 1992. On the 12th of December 1992, we were married.

Say ‘I do’ in ’92

As a bit of a joke, I had set my New Year’s Resolution at the end of 1991 to say ‘I do’ in ’92. That was never going to happen unless I found the perfect person to share my life. I had decided many years before that I would never ‘settle’ for anyone but the right one. Pauline was and is the right one. I truly believe that God brought us together and I thank him for such a beautiful gift.

Today we’ve been married for twenty eight years.

As the years have gone on we’ve added others into our family. In 1996 we welcomed Emily. James was born in 1998. Then, in 2017, Josh joined the family when he married Emily. It’s all part of the richness of our marriage and life together.

I often have to catch my breath when I think about the fact that I get to walk the journey of life beside such a smart, wise, clever, funny, beautiful, extraordinary woman who I love more than any other person on this big blue planet. I am truly blessed.



Do you think some of your friends would enjoy reading Thankful for another year? Please use the buttons below to share the post. Thanks.

John Miguel

Just before COVID-19 shut down the world, I was in the Philippines with Compassion Australia.

I met a number of beautiful families who are facing incredible hardship due to extreme poverty.

The first family I met was that of Marinessa and Joey, a young couple, both 25 years of age, who have 4 children. The family of six live in a small shanty made of rusted iron sheets, about 2 metres by 2 metres. Their home is next to a pile of rubbish in the shadow of the local cemetery. The landlord keeps threatening to raise the cost of the land they use which would essentially see them losing everything.

Their 3-year-old son, John Miguel, had just been registered with Compassion. I knew that finding John a sponsor would make an incredible difference for the whole family.

Please take a couple of minutes to watch this video about their story.

I know that life would have become even harder for this family since the pandemic. Can I ask you to consider sponsoring a child like John and bring hope into their life? Please sponsor a child today.



Do you think some of your friends would enjoy reading John Miguel? Please use the buttons below to share the post. Thanks.

Sheridan Voysey – Reflections

Sheridan Voysey is the author of seven books, a broadcaster heard by millions of people and a speaker in demand in several countries.

He’s been featured in publications like The Times, Sunday Telegraph, Christianity Today, and the devotional, Our Daily Bread. Sheridan is a presenter of Pause for Thought on BBC Radio Breakfast. He contributes to media across the UK, US, Europe, and Australia and speaks at events around the world. Much of his success has come from the courage to share some of the deepest moments of his life with his various audiences.

Sheridan is this week’s guest on my podcast, Bleeding Daylight. As he tells his story, Sheridan uses his own search for meaning and significance to open a wider conversation about common human experience and discovering the divine. We also discuss his new book, Reflect with Sheridan, a book that brings together inspiring stories of joy, wonder, meaning, belonging, compassion, calling, seasons, change, and hope.

Find Bleeding Daylight wherever you listen to podcasts or click play on the media player below.



Do you think some of your friends would enjoy reading Sheridan Voysey – Reflections? Please use the buttons below to share the post. Thanks.